A mixture of sugar and sugar and sugar that looks and tastes amazing.

by
on October 9, 2015 on 10/9/15 from ,

Is Japanese Food Healthy?

After one month staying in Japan and eating Japanese food every day, my answer for this is “No.”

Is Japanese Food Healthy?

Is Japanese Food Healthy?

During my first month in Japan, I often have people asking me how is my new life is, and my immediate answer is “oishii desu” (it’s delicious!). I really love Japanese foods. I find they are not only visually attractive but also taste amazingly. I can’t remember the names of every thing I have eaten so far, but all of them are so good, and I would hate to say any bad thing about them. However, forget about the taste, I must say that Japanese foods are pretty nutritionally unbalanced and not very for your health.

 

A Japanese lunch set I had in Asakusa, which includes two big deep fried shrimp tempura, some salty pickles, and a bowl of salty miso soup.

A tempura lunch set I had in Asakusa, which includes two big deep fried shrimp tempura, some salty pickles, and a bowl of salty miso soup.

Before coming to Japan, I have heard all the positive claims about how healthy Japanese foods are, especially their tofu, seaweed, and matcha. Unfortunately, they are not in all Japanese dishes, and even in the case they are, it is the way of cooking that changes everything. Seafoods are good for your health, but most people do not eat sushi/fishes every day. And unfortunately, fruits and vegetables are pretty expensive in Japan as well.

 

Sukiyaki with Horse Meat.

Sukiyaki with Horse Meat.

Most of the Japanese common dishes are either quite high in salt (ramen) or deep fried (tempura). The miso soup, in my opinion, is basically a mixture of water and salt. Their common condiments, such as soy sauce, are also very salty. Also, other typical Japanese pickles, umeboshi, canned foods are all covered in salt.

 

I ordered the smallest portion but couldn't finish. This is quite tasty, though.

I ordered the smallest portion but couldn’t finish. This is quite tasty, though.

After salt, here comes the sugar! I have to admit that I have become addicted to Japanese sweets and desserts, especially the matcha ice-cream. I know I should limit my sugar intake, but how could I when they look this good and taste heavenly (T_T)

A mixture of sugar and sugar and sugar that looks and tastes amazing.

A mixture of sugar and sugar and sugar that looks and tastes amazing.

Matcha Choux

 

Who can say no to ice cream? Definitely not me.

Now I begin to feel guilty every time I eat. One of my new friends, who is also an international student, told me that she had gained more than 15 pounds in her first year in Japan. However, it is not all about gaining or losing weight. We all know aboutĀ over consuming sugar, salt, and deep fried foods can lead to many other health problems, but it is so hard for me to maintain a healthy eating habit in Japan.