by
on May 24, 2014 on 5/24/14 from ,

5 Things People Told You about Ghana and You Didn’t Believe

In Ghana, people live in a very laid-back kind of way. The Ghanaian saying of “do not worry†really rings true in many areas of life.

1.  The Heat: It is HOT.

Ghana’s weather during the month of May usually gets around the middle-high 80’s; however it can get dry and humid at times.  I have learned to use sunscreen with 70+ SPF every morning while getting ready.  I’ve noticed that a lot of Ghanaians carry around a cloth in their pockets to wipe off sweat—that is definitely something I need to get my hands on soon.

2.  Ghana time is real

In Ghana, people live in a very laid-back kind of way.  The Ghanaian saying of “do not worry” really rings true in many areas of life. I experienced my first moment of “Ghana time” when my friends and I ate at a restaurant for dinner.  We arrived at the restaurant at 7:00 PM and did not get our food until 1 hour later.  However, it was definitely worth the wait.

3.  Mosquitos: They are real and here

BUZZ! SUCK! BUZZ!  Word from a person who has been in Accra for four days: bring that bottle of OFF! Deepwoods with deet!  I’ve spent my evenings in Accra hanging out with friends by the local pool and just relaxing—there is such a calming and tranquil feeling to being in Accra.  However, be prepared to battle off mosquitos or else you might wake up the next day with bites all over your legs!

4.  The Food = YUM!

A big part of experiencing any culture is food—and Ghana tops the list!  The food here is so yummy!  My favorite dish at the moment has to be the classic jallof rice with spicy chicken. It is mouthwatering; I have had it about three times in four days!

5.  Ghanaians are your new best friends

Akwaaba! That is the greeting that so many locals have told in during my time in here.  People have been so welcoming and friendly.  I first experienced their kindness when a local Ghanaian man stow away my carryon luggage on the airplane to Accra—the kindness and help has not stopped then. I’ve learned that Ghanaians want to talk with you